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Mushroom Poisoning in Northwest of Iran

AUTHORS

Mojtaba Varshochi 1 , * , Behrooz Naghili 1

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran

How to Cite: Varshochi M, Naghili B. Mushroom Poisoning in Northwest of Iran, Arch Clin Infect Dis. Online ahead of Print ; 2(4):169-175.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases: 2 (4); 169-175
Article Type: Research Article

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Abstract

Background: Mycetismus or mushroom poisoning is an important health concern and a potentially fatal state that usually occurs after incidental ingestion of mushrooms sexual organs or fruiting bodies of fungus among the mycologists and the one who desire a natural or organic diet. The vast majority of mortality due to mushroom poisonings is attributed to fungus belonging to genus Amanita.

Materials and methods: This report describes 34 cases with A. phalloides mushroom poisoning regarding the epidemiological presentation, clinical manifestation and laboratory findings. These patients were admitted in three hospitals of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences during 1989-1994.

Results: The age of victims ranged from 4-75 years. Diagnosis of A. phalloides mushroom poisoning was confirmed by mycologist in 12 cases, toxicological studies in 5 cases and combined mycological and toxicological approaches in 3 cases. It was only suspected in 14 cases as the patients had died before being admitted or immediately after hospitalization. Ingestion of doubtful mushrooms was found either in their histories or mushrooms poisoning was documented in their relatives. Most of the victims (68%) were affected in spring, while no case was reported in summer.

Conclusion: Mushroom poisoning should be considered in differential diagnosis of any case of acute gastroenteritis, especially during spring and fall when moderate temperature and moist conditions facilitate mushrooms growth.

Keywords

Mushroom poisoning, Amanita phalloides, Hepatotoxicity

© 0, Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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