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Tuberculous brain abscess in a child wit cystic fibrosis; a case report

AUTHORS

Mojtaba Rostami 1 , * , Monirsadat Emadoleslami 2 , Iraj Karimi 1

1 Research Center for Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

2 Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

How to Cite: Rostami M, Emadoleslami M, Karimi I. Tuberculous brain abscess in a child wit cystic fibrosis; a case report, Arch Clin Infect Dis. Online ahead of Print ; 1(4):201-3.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases: 1 (4); 201-3
Article Type: Case Report

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Abstract

Background: Tuberculous brain abscess is an extremely rare manifestation of tuberculous involvement of the central nervous system. In countries such as India where tuberculosis is fairly common, few cases of tuberculous brain abscess have been reported.

Patient: The patient was an 8-year old boy presented with the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and a history of tonic and clonic convulsions since 2 years ago with normal brain CT scan. Two months ago he became febrile and complained of severe headache that often awakened him up. Diagnosis of intracranial abscess was made clinically and the patient received ceftriaxon, amikacin and clindamycine; however, 2 weeks of treatment failed to show improvement. During craniotomy multiple cystic lesions and a mass of 938cm in frontoparietal area was found. After operation the patient developed severe hepatitis with elevated enzymes and bilirubin level due to anesthesia and anti- tuberculous treatment. Drugs were discontinued but fever persisted and he started a downhill course. While hepatitis was going to resolve, restarting antituberculous drugs flared up hepatitis and 3 days later he expired because of hepatic failure.

Conclusion: Meningitis is an entity of tuberculous infection in subjects living in countries of high burden tuberculosis thus, it should be kept in mind for suspicious subjects.

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© 0, Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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