Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus, Hepatitis B virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Related Risk Factors Among Hemophilia and Thalassemia Patients in Iran

AUTHORS

Hamid Kalantari 1 , Ahmad Mirzabaghi 2 , Mojtaba Akbari 3 , Zahra Shahshahan 4 , *

1 Associate Professor, Department of Gastroenterology, Isfahan Liver Disease research center, Isfahan, IR Iran

2 Resident, Department of Internal Medicine

3 Epidemiologist

4 Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran.

How to Cite: Kalantari H, Mirzabaghi A, Akbari M, Shahshahan Z. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus, Hepatitis B virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Related Risk Factors Among Hemophilia and Thalassemia Patients in Iran, Arch Clin Infect Dis. Online ahead of Print ; 6(2):0-0.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases: 6 (2); 0-0
Article Type: Research Article

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Abstract

Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among hemophilia and thalassemia patients.

Patients and Methods: Present study was conducted from October 2008 to December 2010 in Isfahan, Iran. One thousand one hundred and sixty adult multi-transfused patients (822 males, 338 females, mean age 22.711.5 years) suffering from beta-thalassemia (n = 545) and hemophilia (n=615) were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were obtained from the patients and were tested for HBs Ag, Anti-HCV Ag and Anti- HIV Ab. HCV positive patients underwent genotype determination.

Results: Of 545 thalassemia patients, 312(57.2%) were male and 233 (42.8%) were female. From 615 hemophilia

patients, 511(83%) were male and 104 (17%) were female. Chronic hepatitis was detected in 505(82.1%) hemophilia patients of which 495 (98%) were HCV Ab positive and 10 (2%) had HBsAg positive. The prevalence of HCV Ab positive and HBsAg positive in 56 (11%) thalassemia patients with chronic hepatitis was 50 (89.2%) and 6 (10.8%) respectively. None of the thalassemia and hemophilia patients were positive for HIV Ab. History of hepatitis in family is the major risk factors and HCV genotype 1 was the major genotype in our patients.

Conclusion: HCV is the major virus of concern in multi-transfused patients. The strategies for prevention of HCV, HBV and HIV and safety of blood products in this respect have indeed been successful.

Keywords

Transfusion, Blood-Borne Pathogens, Chronic Hepatitis, Thalassemia, Hemophilia.

© 0, Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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